Healthcare.com: ‘This is not a one-time thing’

HealthCare.com – 3/18/2018 8:36:13Today, a group of more than 60,000 people took to the streets in the United States to call for action against the opioid epidemic. 

“In the US, there are more people dying every day of drug overdoses than deaths from any other disease,” President Donald Trump said on Friday.

“This is a crisis we need to address immediately.” 

A new study published in the journal BMC Medicine found that a single dose of fentanyl administered to the eyes, nose and throat can cause a fatal overdose. 

It was the first time that the researchers had looked at the effects of fentanyl on the brain, which they believe could be the key to a new treatment. 

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid made from the opioid-like drug fentanyl, which is often referred to as a ‘party drug’. 

“It’s a lot stronger than heroin, which we’re going to need a lot of to get rid of this epidemic,” Dr. Scott Wahl, senior associate at the Center for Addiction and Mental Health, told reporters. 

The drug is often abused by those who are high on heroin or cocaine, and is often mixed with fentanyl to make it more potent and less addictive. 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there are about 17.5 million deaths in the US from opioids each year. 

President Trump and other top politicians have blamed the opioid crisis on “carnage” by pharmaceutical companies, but the data suggests the real cause may be a lack of adequate prescription drugs. 

Dr. Robert Lustig, a researcher at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and an expert in opioid use and addiction, told the New York Times that the number of people dying from overdoses in the past three years has not increased, which has led to a significant rise in the amount of people using the drug. 

He also noted that the increase in overdose deaths in recent years has been tied to a number of factors. 

This is the first study to look at the role of fentanyl in the brain and see how it affects brain chemistry. 

More to come.